The LinkedIn Tutors

Build your business with LinkedIn


LinkedIn makes it easier to endorse connections’ expertise

It’s now going to be easier to give your LinkedIn contacts’ some public recognition for their expertise.

LinkedIn has launched a new feature – one-click endorsements – to allow people to quickly recognise their connections’ specific skills.

On a connection’s profile, you’ll see endorsements they have received, and you can make your own. And if someone endorses one of your skills or suggests you add a new one, you’ll be notified.

LinkedIn says the new feature is being launched in English across the United States, India, New Zealand, and Australia, and expanding in all languages to all members over the next few weeks.


4 Steps to Finding the Right LinkedIn Groups for You

Many of my LinkedIn coaching clients  want to build new relationships with prospective clients.  LinkedIn groups can help you do this.  However, before you join any groups, you need to answer the following question – who is your customer? What is their industry, title or function, and where are they located?

For example, I recently searched LinkedIn groups to help me find marketing directors who work within the Fast Moving Consumer Goods (FMCG) sector and live in London.  I’ll use this target group as an example of how you can find the right groups for you.

1.     Go to the Groups directory on LinkedIn field:  “UK AND Marketing”. In  the search results, tick the “Open groups” box.  This means you will find groups that are open to all.  If you see the lock icon on a group’s landing page, this means that you must ask to join the group and may not be allowed to join if you don’t meet their member criteria.

2.    You will see a list of possible groups to join.  Click on a group’s name and you will be taken to its landing page.  You will see your photo and the “Start a Discussion” text box – don’t worry – you haven’t joined yet. 🙂

3.  Have a look at the group’s statistics before joining.  There is no point in joining a group that doesn’t include your target market. To view group statistics, scroll down the right column of the Group page, and click on the black “View Group Statistics” button. The group statistics will give you an idea of how active the group is, who is in it, and where they are based.  Make sure you look at the demographics of the group in order to confirm that there are members at the right experience level and in the right industry, in  my case, director level members within the FMCG sector who work in London.

4.    If you find that the group is full of your target audience, join the group! If your target market is not in the group, then move on to the next group found in your search results until you find the right group for you.  If you don’t find it, start a LinkedIn group yourself!

How do you find the right LinkedIn groups for you? I’m interested in hearing your own tips and suggestions.


Tips for getting the most out of attending events by using LinkedIn

Use LinkedIn to get more value out of every event you attend.

Here are some tips for integrating LinkedIn into your face-to-face networking activities when attending an event:

Before the event:

  1. Let your LinkedIn connections know you are attending by posting a ‘status update’ on your profile.
  2. Post the event in your LinkedIn Groups and ask if anyone is going and would like to meet up during the event.
  3. Let everyone on LinkedIn see that you are attending by searching LinkedIn Events (in the ‘More’ menu) for the event and clicking on the ‘I’m attending’ button.
  4. See if there is anyone you’d like to meet at the event by going to the event’s LinkedIn page and having a look at who is attending. You may want to connect before the event and suggest meeting up at the event.
  5. If the event is not listed on LinkedIn, you can create an event page and let your connections know you are attending.  Others can then go to the page you’ve created and register their attendance as well.

After the event:

  1. If you meet someone new at the event, send them a personalised LinkedIn invitation to join your network.
  2. Once you’ve connected, have a look at their connections, is there anyone there you’d like to be introduced to?  Ask for an introduction via LinkedIn or by picking up the phone and calling your 1st degree contact.
  3. Notice what groups your new LinkedIn connection has joined – would these be good groups for you to join?  Find out by going to the LinkedIn Group landing page and clicking on the ‘See group statistics’ black button.

How do you use LinkedIn to build on the face-to-face networking you do?


Is LinkedIn a replacement for face-to-face networking ?

I’m a LinkedIn coach, so of course, I am very keen on LinkedIn as a marketing and business development tool.  But does it replace face-to-face networking?  Absolutely not!

Some people have the misconception that if you simply have a LinkedIn profile, the business should starting rolling in.  LinkedIn activities are most effective when they are used in conjunction with offline networking.  LinkedIn can help you raise awareness and interest in your offering, keep you ‘front of mind’ with current clients and reveal potential new clients.  The key is to take your online networking activities offline.

If you are in the professional services sector (lawyers, accountants, architects, designers, etc), you will rarely gain a new client through purely online activity.  Usually a phone call or face-to-face meeting needs to take place before the prospect knows you well enough and trusts you to give you their business.

Use LinkedIn by all means, but always focus on how you can take your online relationships offline — and watch your business grow.

Do you have any examples of how your LinkedIn activities have resulted in new business?   I’d love to hear from you!