The LinkedIn Tutors

Build your business with LinkedIn


UK law firms using LinkedIn company pages

If you search on LinkedIn for law firms in the UK, you’ll find a little under 2000 firms are listed as either law practices or legal services (some of these aren’t actually law firms but are services for law firms).

Amid that crowd, how do you stand out?

One way is by having an excellent company page, making use of LinkedIn’s tools to attract and retain interest in your brand.

What makes a good company page? The most immediate impact is simply visual – the branding of the image at the top of your page is a key element in conveying something quickly about your identity, character or offering.

Next, it’s key to have some fresh updates with information that’s relevant to whomever you want to develop relationships with – your clients, potential recruits, and other stakeholders. If you want these people to ‘follow’ your company on LinkedIn so they’ll automatically receive any updates you post on your page, you have to show them first that you’re going to deliver information and news that’s interesting and relevant to them.

Finally, if you offer distinctive services (or products) you should specify these in the products/services section, preferably including links to the relevant sections of your own web site.

I’ve made a quick  list – see it on Listly – of some of the better UK law firm company pages on LinkedIn. On the Listly page, you can voice your opinion or like/unlike a page, or send me a better example if you want me to include that instead. I’ve selected pages from some firms of different sizes, to show what’s possible at any size.

UK law firms with good LinkedIn company pages


Generating sales in professional services using LinkedIn

How do you get the best out of LinkedIn to generate sales in professional services?

For a great starting point, check out this blog on using LinkedIn for sales prospecting from Anna Bratton at Salesforce.

I particularly like her advice on using LinkedIn’s advanced search function well:

“By intelligently mixing the different filters you can get really deep and identify key individuals quickly and easily….You can also save your search criteria and get a weekly report listing anyone new who matches the customers you’re looking for.”

And she also explains how it’s possible to map the decision makers within target companies:

“You’d be surprised how much people put in their profiles – which team they’re in, which office they work out of, what projects they’re focusing on. With a little detective work, you can quickly build up a picture of who you should be talking to, what they’re like (check out their recommendations) and what they’ve done before.”

Great advice – in professional services, it clearly makes sense to use these ways to find the specific individuals you want to talk with and their role in any decision to engage your services. I’ll be talking about these and other ideas in my next workshop on Using LinkedIn as a Business Development and Marketing Tool.


4 Steps to Finding the Right LinkedIn Groups for You

Many of my LinkedIn coaching clients  want to build new relationships with prospective clients.  LinkedIn groups can help you do this.  However, before you join any groups, you need to answer the following question – who is your customer? What is their industry, title or function, and where are they located?

For example, I recently searched LinkedIn groups to help me find marketing directors who work within the Fast Moving Consumer Goods (FMCG) sector and live in London.  I’ll use this target group as an example of how you can find the right groups for you.

1.     Go to the Groups directory on LinkedIn field:  “UK AND Marketing”. In  the search results, tick the “Open groups” box.  This means you will find groups that are open to all.  If you see the lock icon on a group’s landing page, this means that you must ask to join the group and may not be allowed to join if you don’t meet their member criteria.

2.    You will see a list of possible groups to join.  Click on a group’s name and you will be taken to its landing page.  You will see your photo and the “Start a Discussion” text box – don’t worry – you haven’t joined yet. 🙂

3.  Have a look at the group’s statistics before joining.  There is no point in joining a group that doesn’t include your target market. To view group statistics, scroll down the right column of the Group page, and click on the black “View Group Statistics” button. The group statistics will give you an idea of how active the group is, who is in it, and where they are based.  Make sure you look at the demographics of the group in order to confirm that there are members at the right experience level and in the right industry, in  my case, director level members within the FMCG sector who work in London.

4.    If you find that the group is full of your target audience, join the group! If your target market is not in the group, then move on to the next group found in your search results until you find the right group for you.  If you don’t find it, start a LinkedIn group yourself!

How do you find the right LinkedIn groups for you? I’m interested in hearing your own tips and suggestions.


Tips for getting the most out of attending events by using LinkedIn

Use LinkedIn to get more value out of every event you attend.

Here are some tips for integrating LinkedIn into your face-to-face networking activities when attending an event:

Before the event:

  1. Let your LinkedIn connections know you are attending by posting a ‘status update’ on your profile.
  2. Post the event in your LinkedIn Groups and ask if anyone is going and would like to meet up during the event.
  3. Let everyone on LinkedIn see that you are attending by searching LinkedIn Events (in the ‘More’ menu) for the event and clicking on the ‘I’m attending’ button.
  4. See if there is anyone you’d like to meet at the event by going to the event’s LinkedIn page and having a look at who is attending. You may want to connect before the event and suggest meeting up at the event.
  5. If the event is not listed on LinkedIn, you can create an event page and let your connections know you are attending.  Others can then go to the page you’ve created and register their attendance as well.

After the event:

  1. If you meet someone new at the event, send them a personalised LinkedIn invitation to join your network.
  2. Once you’ve connected, have a look at their connections, is there anyone there you’d like to be introduced to?  Ask for an introduction via LinkedIn or by picking up the phone and calling your 1st degree contact.
  3. Notice what groups your new LinkedIn connection has joined – would these be good groups for you to join?  Find out by going to the LinkedIn Group landing page and clicking on the ‘See group statistics’ black button.

How do you use LinkedIn to build on the face-to-face networking you do?


Is LinkedIn a replacement for face-to-face networking ?

I’m a LinkedIn coach, so of course, I am very keen on LinkedIn as a marketing and business development tool.  But does it replace face-to-face networking?  Absolutely not!

Some people have the misconception that if you simply have a LinkedIn profile, the business should starting rolling in.  LinkedIn activities are most effective when they are used in conjunction with offline networking.  LinkedIn can help you raise awareness and interest in your offering, keep you ‘front of mind’ with current clients and reveal potential new clients.  The key is to take your online networking activities offline.

If you are in the professional services sector (lawyers, accountants, architects, designers, etc), you will rarely gain a new client through purely online activity.  Usually a phone call or face-to-face meeting needs to take place before the prospect knows you well enough and trusts you to give you their business.

Use LinkedIn by all means, but always focus on how you can take your online relationships offline — and watch your business grow.

Do you have any examples of how your LinkedIn activities have resulted in new business?   I’d love to hear from you!


Does your Twitter feed add value to your LinkedIn profile?

Personally, I don’t like to see someone’s entire twitter feed on their LinkedIn profile – especially if they use twitter as a business channel AND a personal one.  I am interested in any business-related conversations or information they can provide via twitter but I am decidedly not interested in where they are going for dinner or how nice it is for them to walk their dog!

I decided to find out what others thought and created a poll on LinkedIn.

Does seeing a person’s complete twitter feed on their LinkedIn profile annoy you?

Yes:                  96%

No:                     4%

Don’t care:           0%

For details of the poll, click on the link below:

http://linkd.in/szJMLl

Based on the results of this poll, I took my twitter feed off of my LinkedIn profile and now post twitter jargon free status updates — there’s no point in annoying people when you don’t have to!

What’s your view?


No more hit and miss when joining LinkedIn Groups

Until recently, if you wanted to join a closed LinkedIn Group, you could only see which of your connections were group members before joining.  You may have joined groups based on this information and then found, once you were a member, that the group wasn’t what you thought it was and you had little in common with the other group members.

That’s all changed now.

If you want to learn more about a LinkedIn Group (closed or open) before joining, you can look at the group’s statistics (found on the right hand side of a group’s landing page) before clicking on the ‘join’ button.

This handy statistical infographic provides the titles of the group members,  where they are based, the group’s discussion activity level and much more.  You now don’t have to join a LinkedIn Group blindfolded only to find out it’s not for you.

Which new LinkedIn tools have you found helpful?